Designing Adaptive Kitchens for Active Aging Clients

Aging is traditionally seen as a negative experience fraught with challenges and limitations. Baby Boomers are changing that narrative and reshaping what it means to age for themselves and future generations. With this shift comes a heightened sense of health, wellness, and desire to stay at home — to live in place. To accomplish that, architects and designers must approach adaptive kitchens to suit the changing needs of older adults as well as multigenerational users. This course will examine active aging; adaptive kitchen design; and connected, smart appliances that are as high-performance as they are functional. The CEU qualifies for continuing education credits that count toward the National Association of Home Builders’ (NAHB’s) Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) credential.

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The Future of Kitchen Design: Incorporating Style, Technology, and Wellness

The kitchen is the gathering place of the home. What factors are influencing design transformation over the next few years, and how can kitchen appliances contribute to a more connected, multifunctional space? This course will explore the state of the kitchen industry, results from a national kitchen and bath design trends survey, examples of smart appliances and their role in a connected kitchen, and the impact of wellness and sustainability on kitchen design.

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Kitchen Design for the Next Generation: Sustainability, Planned Durability, and Mindfulness (Print Course)

Different generations often have different values, priorities, and spending habits. By understanding some of the fundamental characteristics of those aged 30-44, a generational cross-section of Gen Xers and Millennials, design professionals can better cater to their needs. Everything from home size to social media use to environmental concerns impact the way younger Gen Xers and older Millennials build, renovate, and think about design.

Having a basic understanding of how this age group engages with the design process, as well as having a solid grasp of mindful design, sustainable kitchen design, and planned durability, will enable specifiers to attract, connect with, and propose solutions that align with their clients’ goals.

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Kitchens of the Future: Healthy, Sustainable, and Connected

The kitchen has been trending toward minimalism, sustainability, and the increasing desire of consumers to eat healthy foods, often cooked at home. Homeowners are now more aware of the importance of sustainable, healthy building materials, and designers are reimagining the kitchen from the standpoint of storage, prep, cooking, disposal, consumption, and social activity. This course will look to the future of kitchen design, including how connected appliances will change the way we interact in the kitchen.

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Redefining Kitchen Design While Improving Health and Wellness

Whether you are taking this course in 2020 or beyond, you have lived through an unprecedented global pandemic that has changed how we approach life. What it means to work, socialize with friends and family, and even prepare a meal altered drastically within the space of a few weeks. People who barely knew how to turn on their oven started experimenting in the kitchen; others, accustomed to dining out, found themselves food prepping for weeks at a time; and many people with families, partners, or roommates found themselves once again gathering together at meal times. Included in all of its life-altering impacts, the pandemic has changed the way we live at home, including how we utilize our kitchens, home offices, and technology.

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Merging the Outdoors with Kitchen Design: Creating the Luxury Outdoor Kitchen Oasis

Combining outdoor in both indoor and outdoor spaces is a key request from homeowners in today’s building market. As revealed in a recent survey of architects, rooms that have seen particularly strong growth in popularity over the past year include outdoor living areas and rooms. Almost 63 percent of residential architects surveyed report that interest in outdoor living areas/rooms are increasing, while fewer than 2 percent report interest to be declining. The increased enthusiasm in outdoor living has pushed this special function room to the top of the most popular list.

Architects and designers are being asked to specify outdoor spaces, in particular kitchen spaces, that are not only functional but aesthetically pleasing. With the renewed energy surrounding biophilic design concepts, architects and designers must understand best practices for outdoor kitchen design, as well as appliance considerations that are available. Overall, the form and function of the outdoor kitchen space must be well thought out and designed in a way that promotes safety and wellness for the homeowners who enjoy it.

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Transforming the American Kitchen through Quality, Innovation, and Design (Print Course)

The economic, technological, and societal challenges new businesses face and how these businesses can learn from legacy companies that have survived and succeeded through the decades will be explored. This topic will be viewed, in part, through the lens of a kitchen appliance manufacturer who has played an integral role in moving an age-old industry forward through innovation, craftsmanship, and customer service. The evolution of the kitchen will also be examined, as well as the role innovation has played in transforming the kitchen from a utilitarian, sometimes dysfunctional space into the hub of the home.

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Best Practices for Designing Kitchen Islands

A well-designed kitchen island is much more than an afterthought; preferably, it is an integral part of the kitchen’s ability to serve the occupant’s needs. Over the years, kitchen islands have evolved to offer homeowners and designers more than just extra counter space; instead, the kitchen island has become a unique opportunity for customization.

When specifying a kitchen island, the first step is determining the function of the island. The ideal kitchen island requires as much planning and consideration as the rest of a well-designed kitchen. This multi-purpose space provides designers with creative options, such as a cooking workstation, a prep workstation, seating for guests, a breakfast bar, or even home office area.

This course begins with an overview of the kitchen island’s purpose and then narrows down to best practices for specification of storage, countertops, and undercounter appliances, as well as lighting, ventilation, specialty appliances, and computer charging stations.

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Designing Minimalist Kitchens that Maximize Style

Minimalism is a philosophy of simplicity that’s taken off since the pandemic. More homeowners are demanding minimalist kitchen designs, but what does that mean – and what does it look like? This course will explore the concepts of minimalism and minimalist design, trends shaping modern kitchen design and use, and how minimalist design can be used to increase and improve the functionality of the kitchen. Finally, learners will review the role of luxury appliances in a minimalist kitchen and how to specify appliances to meet changing consumer needs.

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