Alan Organschi's Building the Regenerative City

This On Demand CEU is a recorded presentation from a previously live webinar event. The built environment is responsible for an estimated 40% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions as well as a host of other global ecological and social impacts. By 2050, there will be 2.3 billion new inhabitants of global cities. Demand for new buildings and infrastructure will grow accordingly, placing an increasingly heavy burden on critical resources and vulnerable ecosystems. Resource deprivation will further disenfranchise an ever-larger segment of human populations.

This course utilizes insight from an internationally recognized architect, Alan Organschi, who calls for the re-formation of the Anthropocene and the reshaping of our burgeoning cities—the way we build them, organize them, distribute their services, and inhabit them.

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Susan Jones: Disruptive Ecologies

This On Demand CEU is a recorded presentation from a previously live webinar event. This guest lecture presented by Susan Jones, FAIA, provides insight into an ecological journey of a decade-long search for sustainable design strategies. The course focuses on how mass timber can be used as a lower-carbon approach to building design while also maintaining the safety and well-being of the occupants.

The course depicts several case studies that demonstrate the architect’s lessons learned which enabled more sustainable building design opportunities in the future. The course discusses the process of changing regulations for the use of mass timber as a material of choice in a variety of buildings, particularly Type 4c, Type 4b, and Type 4a buildings, where it was not allowed previously in the United States.

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Specifying to Avoid Paint Failure – The Importance of Paint Selection

Architects have an important role to play in proper surface preparation and coatings selection through project-specific painting specification. It’s important for architects and designers to be actively involved in the specifying process and to understand the limitations, benefits, and features of different paints and coatings.

This course will help the learner to understand the main causes of paint and coating failures, the importance of proper surface preparation for various substrates, and problem-solving primers and other coating technologies that can help improve the longevity of structures.

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A Planning Guide for Accessible Restrooms

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) sets the minimum requirements for newly designed and constructed or renovated state and local government facilities, public accommodations, and commercial facilities to be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities. When designing restrooms, some of each type of accessible plumbing fixture and restroom accessories and their installation location must meet accessibility requirements contained in the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design. Many projects must also follow the provisions of the 2017 Edition of the ICC A117.1 Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities Standard.

As states adopt the 2021 International Building Code (IBC) into their states’ building code, the ICC A117.1-2017 Accessible Standards will become effective for existing and new buildings. Forty-six states follow the ICC A117.1-2017 Standards (all but California, Hawaii, Massachusetts and Texas; who harmonize with the ADA Standards). Additionally, states such as California have accessible requirements that vary from the ADA standards and are more stringent providing greater access.

In this course, we will cover the 2010 ADA and the ICC A117.1-2017 accessibility standards. We will also point out where and how the states including California, Florida and Minnesota building codes differ from the ADA and the ICC A117.1-2017 standards. It is important that you always check the accessibility standards that apply to your project’s location.

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Sustainability and Design Benefits of Composite Cladding

This On Demand CEU is a recorded presentation from a previously live webinar event. This course will explore the versatility of wood plastic composites, with a specific focus on composite rainscreen cladding. It will cover the sustainability of wood plastic composites from manufacturing, performance, and life cycle perspectives. We will also discuss color and design options for composite cladding, as well as applications in the residential and commercial sectors.

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The WELL Building Standard and Electric Fireplaces (Print Course)

Wellness is a growing trend in many industries, including building design. This is especially true since the COVID-19 pandemic markedly disrupted how we work, learn, live, and play in the spaces we inhabit.

This course will analyze the growth of the wellness industry as it relates to the built environment and will introduce the learner to the WELL Building Standard, which is a rating system to help buildings and organizations deliver more thoughtful and intentional spaces. Concurrently, we will explore how hearth products such as electric fireplaces can be incorporated into commercial and residential design to enhance occupant health and well-being.

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Innovations in Wood: Understanding the Latest Advances in Wood Research and Design

This On Demand CEU is a recorded presentation with ARCHITECT's Editor in Chief. Specifying wood in building design has a multitude of benefits, including elevating the design of the project, enhancing sustainable initiatives, and incorporating mixed materials for innovative buildings.

In this session, ARCHITECT explores the work and research of several firms using wood for innovative designs.

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Resilient Design and the Evolving Standard of Care

This On Demand CEU is a recorded presentation from a previously live webinar event. At the conclusion of this program attendees will be able to identify, analyze, and determine the need for alternative design approaches to account for more dynamic weather and climate-related events that pose an increasing risk to the health and safety of the public by identifying likely hazards and project site-specific exposures. Attendees will learn how the standard of care for design professionals is constantly evolving and will change more rapidly as extreme weather and climate-related events pose a greater risk to human life and infrastructure. By understanding how the standard of care evolves, design professionals will be encouraged to develop more innovative resilient designs that better protect people and property.

After completing this program, attendees will learn how to better identify opportunities to assist clients in adopting more progressive resilient design approaches by focusing on the long-term impacts on human health as well as project life-cycle costs. During this workshop attendees will learn how to better communicate and document resilient design alternatives that serve to better safeguard the public and allow society to recover quicker from a natural catastrophe.

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The Future of Kitchen Design: Incorporating Style, Technology, and Wellness

The kitchen is the gathering place of the home. What factors are influencing design transformation over the next few years, and how can kitchen appliances contribute to a more connected, multifunctional space? This course will explore the state of the kitchen industry, results from a national kitchen and bath design trends survey, examples of smart appliances and their role in a connected kitchen, and the impact of wellness and sustainability on kitchen design.

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Architecting Change: Design Strategies for a Healthy, Resilient, Climate Smart Future (Print Course)

Over the past decade, the architectural, construction and engineering (AEC) sector has grappled with unprecedented technological and socioeconomic changes along with an unprecedented confluence of challenges to the health of our communities, our cities and our planet. Climate change is accelerating—the 10 years leading up to 2020 was the warmest decade on record. Buildings and their construction account for 39% of global carbon dioxide emissions.

At the same time, the built environment is growing at a record pace in the US. It is estimated that 2.5 million new housing units are needed to make up for the nation’s housing shortage, a trend that has not abated in the face of a global pandemic. Technological gains within the built environment are making zero-carbon construction attainable, dramatic energy savings achievable and taller mass timber construction possible. Industry research, along with bold demonstration projects, is expanding the sector’s understanding of carbon sequestration, life cycle assessment (LCA), Passive House principles, and biophilic and health-centered design. In this course you’ll learn from design teams who are embracing these strategies and delivering solutions that begin to address some of the most pressing global challenges of our times.

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