Exploring How Propane-Fueled Hydronic Heating Technologies Improve Sustainability and Occupant Comfort (Print Course)

This course will explore how propane-fueled hydronic heating technologies such as radiant hydronic and forced-air hydronic can improve the sustainability of buildings and the health and comfort of occupants.

We will examine how these technologies work, the advantages of each type, and how building owners can overcome space-heating challenges with hydronic heating systems. Finally, the course will explore several case studies where hydronic heating systems were used to save money, maximize energy efficiency, and improve thermal comfort.

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Welcome to Luxury Kitchen Ventilation: Healthy Indoor Air with Style

While most kitchens do have ventilation systems, homeowners often don’t use them properly and aren’t aware of how quickly cooking can negatively impact a home’s indoor air quality. This course discusses that impact and how proper specification of ventilation systems can significantly improve indoor air quality to protect occupant health and safeguard a home’s fixtures and furnishings from detrimental grease and odors. We will cover how to achieve proper sizing and positioning of a ventilation system, design and customization options, as well as projects where ventilation systems were used to maximize style and safety in residential kitchens.

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Designing Minimalist Kitchens that Maximize Style

Minimalism is a philosophy of simplicity that’s taken off since the pandemic. More homeowners are demanding minimalist kitchen designs, but what does that mean – and what does it look like? This course will explore the concepts of minimalism and minimalist design, trends shaping modern kitchen design and use, and how minimalist design can be used to increase and improve the functionality of the kitchen. Finally, learners will review the role of luxury appliances in a minimalist kitchen and how to specify appliances to meet changing consumer needs.

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Designing Adaptive Kitchens for Active Aging Clients

Aging is traditionally seen as a negative experience fraught with challenges and limitations. Baby Boomers are changing that narrative and reshaping what it means to age for themselves and future generations. With this shift comes a heightened sense of health, wellness, and desire to stay at home — to live in place. To accomplish that, architects and designers must approach adaptive kitchens to suit the changing needs of older adults as well as multigenerational users. This course will examine active aging; adaptive kitchen design; and connected, smart appliances that are as high-performance as they are functional. The CEU qualifies for continuing education credits that count toward the National Association of Home Builders’ (NAHB’s) Certified Aging-in-Place Specialist (CAPS) credential.

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Electric Fireplaces Provide New Heating Strategies for Zero Energy Buildings

Do fireplaces have a role in zero energy projects of our future? The answer is yes, and the optimal solution lies in electric fireplaces. Architects are increasingly focused on Net Zero (NZ), Net Positive (NP), and Zero Energy Ready Homes (ZERH) as a way to reduce the carbon footprint of projects and meet regulatory mandates. Innovative electric fireplace technologies make them a clean heating alternative, providing the look and feel of a real fire without harmful pollutants.

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Exploring a Revolutionary, Systems-Based Approach to Downdraft Ventilation (Print Course)

Proper ventilation while cooking is vital for indoor air quality and must be addressed early in the building process. Downdraft ventilation offers flexibility in design and aesthetics, but it suffers from a poor reputation due to performance issues in early iterations of the technology.

This course covers the importance of indoor air quality, a brief history of cooktop ventilation, and historical challenges with downdraft ventilation. It will discuss a revolutionary, systems-based approach to downdraft ventilation that addresses these challenges, including specification and installation considerations for this new innovation.

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Kitchen Design for the Next Generation: Sustainability, Planned Durability, and Mindfulness (Print Course)

Different generations often have different values, priorities, and spending habits. By understanding some of the fundamental characteristics of those aged 30-44, a generational cross-section of Gen Xers and Millennials, design professionals can better cater to their needs. Everything from home size to social media use to environmental concerns impact the way younger Gen Xers and older Millennials build, renovate, and think about design.

Having a basic understanding of how this age group engages with the design process, as well as having a solid grasp of mindful design, sustainable kitchen design, and planned durability, will enable specifiers to attract, connect with, and propose solutions that align with their clients’ goals.

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Kitchens of the Future: Healthy, Sustainable, and Connected

The kitchen has been trending toward minimalism, sustainability, and the increasing desire of consumers to eat healthy foods, often cooked at home. Homeowners are now more aware of the importance of sustainable, healthy building materials, and designers are reimagining the kitchen from the standpoint of storage, prep, cooking, disposal, consumption, and social activity. This course will look to the future of kitchen design, including how connected appliances will change the way we interact in the kitchen.

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A Whole New Meaning to Low-Cost Luxury

It’s time to remove the price attached to creating a rich living space. Residents want luxury living experiences in their communities, and you don't want to break the bank. Get high-end style without the price - all without skimping on quality.

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Let Affordable Design Work Its Lease-Up Magic

You don’t have to look far for the latest on the multifamily amenity wars. The battle zone isn’t confined to just class A properties, either. In order to compete with style-fussy millennials and Gen Z’ers, class B and C properties are upping their game too.

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