Sustainable Solutions from the Most Visited City in the U.S.

As the most-visited city in the United States, Orlando is uniquely positioned to influence environmental stewardship in communities around the world. From meeting the foundational needs of local residents to providing an enchanting tourism destination in a changing climate, we describe how to leverageĀ local characteristics to enhance sustainable efforts.

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Net Zero Energy Building Design in High Density Urban Cities

Net Zero Energy solutions suitable for urban settings will be increasingly important but there are unique policy and technical challenges to implementing these solutions in large urban buildings in hot and humid climate. Addressing these concerns could open up the possibility of achieving Positive Energy Low Rise, Zero Energy Medium Rise and Super Low Energy High Rise Buildings in the near future.

How do we overcome limited site and roof spaces for renewable energy in urban cities? How do we drive passive design for free cooling in high density environment? How do we reduce the consumption level of plug loads leveraging off the IoT? How do we use the advanced modelling approach to create designs that can achieve Net Zero Energy and then manage the delivery process so that Net Zero Energy performance? How do we move from demonstration phase projects to successful solutions for all buildings?

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Uncovering a Buildingā€™s Heartbeat Sensormatically

While energy use is a key component in building management, it is important that resource use not overshadow a building's purpose: to provide an adequate (or even enhanced) space for humans or machines to operate. Managing this interdependency between comfort and energy is not easy, but it's essential for high performance spaces as changing occupant comfort demands can consume significant amounts of energy. While optimizing each in isolation is simpler, the results could lead to less than ideal outcomes.

As managers seek to optimize both energy use and comfort, well-placed sensors and data collection systems can provide objective, useful, and actionable information. Building energy meters separated by panel, circuit, or receptacle are useful in determining, where, when, and how energy is being used. Comfort can be divided into visual, thermal, acoustic, and air quality categories. Sensors are able to measure each category in order to determine which aspects of comfort might be insufficient. Ultimately, the sensor data can be analyzed to establish linkages and tradeoffs and can lead to solutions that optimize both factors. Four different projects are presented to demonstrate how energy and comfort can be balanced at a building, campus, and program level.

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