Expanding Outdoor Living: Propane for Outdoor Residential Use

Propane gas is considered to be a clean alternative fuel by the EPA; it is a versatile and environmentally safe fuel source for healthy and sustainable living. Many people use propane to fuel their outdoor grills or barbecues, but its much more versatile than a cooking fuel in residential outdoor applications. This learning unit will explore alternative uses for propane, specifically for outdoor use in and around a home.

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Backup Power for Commercial Buildings

This On Demand CEU is a recorded presentation from a previously live webinar event. When the local power grid goes down a commercial building built today might incorporate backup power to be more resilient, to mitigate against financial losses, to protect life safety, to provide vital services, or some combination of these goals. This course covers this important topic, exploring the motivations for using backup power, relevant code and standard requirements, and the fuel options for backup power generators.

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Propane and Building Design for Commercial Businesses

Architects, engineers, developers, and facilities managers have numerous choices when determining fuel sources for commercial buildings, whether those choices involve the practicalities of space and water heating, the aesthetics of fireplaces, fire pits, and outdoor lighting, or the functionalities of building site energy needs.

Combined with these choices is the ever-increasing need to build and plan not only cost-effectively, but with sustainability in mind. This course will help specifiers compare the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of fuel sources and storage options, as well as examining the flexibility and reliability of propane, so that they can more readily determine which fuel source best meets the needs of individual commercial projects.

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Energy Options for Off Grid Homes - The Role of Propane in Off Grid Designs

Off Grid Homes, or homes that are completely independent of traditional utilities like the electric grid, are an increasingly popular design option. There are several motivations for an Off Grid Home design, such as a remote location or very expensive costs for a grid connection.

The energy systems for an Off Grid Home differ significantly from those used in most grid-connected homes, and typically incorporate renewables, battery storage, and a back-up power generator. The selection of appliances and other energy-consuming devices in an Off Grid Home is a detailed process that relies on energy efficiency, non-electric alternatives for thermal loads, and careful design of the home’s envelope. This course discusses all of these issues.

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Community Propane Systems, An Energy and Technology Solution for Developers, Builders, and Homeowners

Gas appliances like ranges, fireplaces, and furnaces are important amenities that many home buyers want in a new home. However in some residential developments, natural gas access may not be feasible and on-site propane storage may also have challenges. Community Propane Systems offer an innovative method for supplying propane to the all of the homes in a community through a centralized delivery system.

Community Propane Systems give developers an option for offering gas access to building lots; they allow builders to offer gas appliance amenities to buyers; and they give home buyers the opportunity to get the technologies they want in a new home. This course discusses how community propane systems work, the use cases for these systems, the value propositions, and the performance benefits of common propane applications that can be used.

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A Comparative Analysis of Residential Heating Systems

Builders, contractors, and homeowners today face a myriad of options for home heating systems. Furnaces, heat pumps - both air-source and ground-source, and even hybrid furnace-heat pump combination systems are all options. Sorting out the best choices requires taking a close look at system costs, efficiency levels, energy prices, comfort impacts, the severity of the climate, and any applicable incentives.

This course summarizes the key findings from an extensive technical analysis of the energy, economic, and environmental results of using various heating systems in different locations throughout the U.S., and updates the prior study from 2013 with more current energy pricing, system specs, and modeling data.

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Introduction to Net Zero Energy Homes and Opportunities to Leverage High Efficiency Propane Systems

This course provides an overview of residential zero net energy (ZNE) homes and gives designers a sense of key issues and strategies for ZNE projects. It explores how ZNE projects may be defined along with the implications of the different definitions of "zero".

The course also characterizes the current ZNE housing market, the general design approach to ZNEs and the opportunities to integrate mixed-fuel home designs in ZNE projects.

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Specifying Propane Standby Generators: Installation and Value Considerations

In the last 10 years, the demand for electricity has increased exponentially due to population growth and the increased use of power-thirsty devices, such as computers and flat-screen TVs. For homeowners in many areas, this has resulted in electrical service outages that cause major disruptions. A standby generator can ensure a homeowner's quality of life by keeping the electricity flowing in the event of a power failure, and it can even serve as a primary energy source for homes built off the grid. In this course, learn why many builders and homeowners are choosing to install propane standby generators and what to consider when selecting the best generator for the job.

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Propane-Enhanced Renewable Energy Systems

Most American homeowners, now acutely aware of fluctuating energy prices and the environmental implications associated with continued use of some conventional energy sources, are driving a demand for alternative energy sources for their homes. As a construction professional, it is up to you to propose alternative energy systems to be used in your homes.

In this course, learn why propane is an ideal backup energy source for a wide range of renewable energy systems.

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The Ultimate Guide to Zero Net Energy Building With Propane

Zero net energy (ZNE) construction represents a vast opportunity for builders and contractors. So what is a zero net energy home? In the simplest terms, a ZNE home produces as much energy as it uses, most commonly using efficient construction methods. Achieving ZNE performance involves a whole-building design approach to consider all of a home's systems — the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting and appliances — in an integrated way.

This e-book collects our most valuable resources on ZNE projects to help you define what ZNE means for you and examine factors such as energy prices, net metering policies, solar resources, incentives, and budget. You’ll see that getting to zero doesn’t mean giving up desirable and high-performance gas systems.

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